Gramercy Park Block Association - Neighborhood News #443

Police Dept. Barricades on Gramercy Park East


Photo by Alex Nguyen

  

In response to many recent neighborhood complaints about the Police Dept. barricades being stored on the sidewalk on Gramercy Park East for nearly two months, yesterday we reached out directly to our friends at the 13th Precinct.  As a result, the barricades will be removed tomorrow.  


Please see Town & Village article "Spike in burglaries, assaults" about the 13th Precinct Community Council meeting. 
Town & Village Logo
Thursday, September 19, 2013

Spike in burglaries, assaults 

 

By Maria Rocha-Buschel  

 

Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel 
Lieutenant Vincent Collins reported a 10 percent increase in burglaries.  
In the first 13th Precinct Community Council meeting after the summer break this past Tuesday, police reported that the precinct has seen recent increases in crime, specifically in grand larceny auto, burglaries and felony assaults.

 

Lieutenant Vincent Collins filled in for the precinct's commanding officer, Deputy Inspector David Ehrenberg, who was tied up with a duty throughout all of Manhattan.

 

Collins reported that there has been a 10 percent increase in burglaries this past month, although most of them are commercial burglaries committed by what police refer to as "office creepers," who have been noted as a problem for the precinct in the past.

 

One resident who works on Fifth Avenue wanted to know about the kinds of buildings where these incidents are occurring, and Police Officer John Considine said that these thieves hit both doorman and non-doorman buildings, often posing as bike messengers or food delivery people.

 

He suggested that to stop it from becoming more of a problem, buildings should make it a practice not to let bike messengers or delivery people past the lobby to prevent them from wandering freely throughout the building and entering offices where they could potentially steal from employees' desks. He added that doing so could also help spread the word among criminals, letting them know that certain buildings are more difficult to get into.

 

Although Collins said that there has been an increase in felony assaults, he noted that there have also been a number of arrests in those cases. "A lot of these have been assaults on officers and have been because of the hospitals that are in the neighborhood," he added.

 

A resident and local business owner said that he's encountered a number of people who seem mentally unstable who could potentially be involved in these assaults, and Collins suggested that anyone who encounters such a situation should call 911, or notify the precinct or 311 if 

the person is more of an ongoing problem for the area.

 

Other residents added that they've had problems with unruly homeless people in the past and seemed doubtful that the police had the authority to detain them for psychiatric evaluation. Linda Janneh from the District Attorney's office said that in cases when people on the street are getting undressed, "releasing bodily fluids" or threatening to cause harm to themselves or others, they can be forced to go to Bellevue. If they are found to be in certifiable need of mental help, they will be kept in the hospital for at least six weeks.

 

Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel
Shana Wertheimer, director of the Prince George Hotel on East 28th Street, discusses its housing of low-income and formerly homeless New Yorkers.
Shana Wertheimer, the director of the Prince George Hotel on East 28th Street, was also at the meeting to speak about services available to the homeless population in the area. The Prince George is run by the organization Common Ground, which is a supportive housing provider for low-income New Yorkers and the formerly homeless.

 

Common Ground has apartments and temporary housing available throughout the state, including the original building in Times Square. Forty percent of the units in the Prince George are set aside for low-income residents and 60 percent are for the formerly homeless, and the case managers help residents with services such as medication monitoring, money management or with any issues they have, the goal being to provide a more economically-friendly alternative to the city's shelter system for homeless people in the area.

 

The increases in grand larceny auto cases have been primarily in the theft of motorcycles, which has been reported in T&V's Police Watch recently, including two in the past week. Collins noted that all of the incidents have happened late at night and they have beefed up specialized units in an attempt to deal with the problem.

 

"We've had a decrease in grand larcenies, which has historically been our nemesis," he added.

 

It also wouldn't have been a 13th Precinct Community Council meeting without a number of complaints about bikes. Considine said that the precinct has been up in enforcement for the past few months, to the disbelief of some of the residents at the meeting, who said that the number of rule-breakers they've seen on bikes has been increasing.

 

Considine admitted that the arrival of Citi Bike has added to the problem but noted that officers have been writing more summonses for cyclists who have been disobeying the traffic laws and riding on the sidewalks.

 

"It's hard to enforce every time it happens and it's not an easy problem to solve," he admitted.

 

The next community council meeting will take place on Tuesday, October 15 at 6:30 p.m. and will include the presentation of Cop of the Month for both September and October.